Amazing transformation

A young man came to our hospital from a region to the east.  Something was causing pain in his leg, so he and his best friend traveled to Soddo Christian Hospital because they knew he would receive excellent care.

About a year ago, a group of Ethiopian Christians from Soddo went to the region of these young men to share the gospel. However, the outreach group purposely decided  not to go to the village of these two men because of the violent reputation of this tribe. They are known for killing up to 30 people in retribution for a single offense.

While the patient and his friend, both from this violent tribe, were at Soddo Christian Hospital, they watched the Jesus Film, and one of our hospital chaplains visited with them. God had touched the heart of the patient's friend, and he was gloriously saved! Not only that, but the new believer is the son of the king of this tribe. He has returned to his home, eager to share the love and truth he found in Christ with his family and tribe.

The son of a king has become a son of the King of Kings. There is much rejoicing here.


Surgical Treatment of Chronic Elbow Dislocation Allowing for Early Range of Motion: Operative Technique and Clinical Results

Surgical Treatment of Chronic Elbow Dislocation Allowing for Early Range of Motion: Operative Technique and Clinical Results

This is the largest case series of surgically treated patients with chronic elbow dislocation. Using our surgical technique, 97% of patients had good or excellent outcome with a low complication rate. Open reduction of chronic elbow dislocation can be accomplished while permitting early motion with minimal recurrent dislocation risk.

We have developed a straightforward surgical technique that allows for early elbow range of motion (ROM) with a little risk of recurrent instability. We present the operative technique and results of this surgical technique from 2 tertiary centers in Ethiopia. Our hypothesis is that our surgical technique and postoperative rehabilitation protocol allows for good patient outcome regardless of injury duration.

Duane R. Anderson, MD,* Justin M. Haller, MD,Lucas A. Anderson, MD,Samuel Hailu, MD,Abebe Chala, PT,* and Shawn W. ODriscoll, MD, PhD§

JOT8538


Life change yard sale

Have you ever considered having a yard sale?

How about selling everything because you're quitting your job and moving to Africa?

Nate and Cherly Ross are doing exactly that!  They plan to join the full time missionary staff at Soddo Christian Hospital in August 2018.  Please pray with us for them during this exciting, stressful, life changing period.

To learn more about their story and process please email ken@soddo.org

 


The God of Ethiopia

This poem was written by a recent visitor to Soddo Christian Hospital. He wanted to remember his visit and this was the method God gave him for remembering his trip.

Where do we find God in Ethiopia,

Do we find Him in the bright, round eyes of a young boy in the hospital huddled close to his father?

Do we find Him in the quiet tears and prayers of a rounds team telling a patient he is going to die?

Do we find him in the tears of a young doctor fighting for a patient's eyesight and begging for God's providence?

Do we find Him in the sweet vespers hymns of a staff worn down by the cares of the day?

Do we find Him in the soft rain watering a thirsty land?

Yes, He is there!!

But He is also in the hearts of missionary men and women who have answered the call of God in their lives and given Him all they have.

And yes He is in the sweet minds and souls of those native Ethiopia's who have heard and heeded his call to salvation.

The God of Ethiopia permeates the heart and soul of the land.

Listen!

Hear His soft voice and footsteps all around you.


It was the best of times. It was the worst of times

Dear Friends and Family,
“It was the best of times. It was the worst of times,” Charles Dickens, The Tale of Two Cities. At Soddo Christian Hospital it is the best of times…we must be doing something right for the hospital is maxed out. But this makes it the worst of times… because the hospital is maxed out! Last month we had 92 women giving birth at our hospital, a new record. On top of the maternity rate rising, our nursing and pediatric staff are overwhelmed with the many sick babies that are born here, as well as those sick infants that are delivered at health centers and by home birth and transferred here for care. These babies born outside our hospital are admitted along with their mother into our maternity department. They require antibiotics and intensive nursing care oftentimes for up to a week or more. These patients require a hospital bed and often times a private room for heat. We do not have a neonatal nursery. Some of our mothers have to be delivered early due to severe high blood pressure or severe hemorrhage. Currently we have two babies, one born 10 weeks early and the other 11. They will require a long hospital stay to survive. By the way, most of these babies that stay here for a long time are underwritten by our maternal benevolent fund. Many of you have been so gracious to contribute to this fund. In the past our mothers went home 6 hours after delivery, but now thanks to the good care they receive from Dr. Ayers, our pediatrician and our family doctor, Dr. Becky McClaren, our healthy babies stay a minimum of 24 hours before discharge. We have 15 postpartum, GYN surgery beds in the maternity ward…compared to 30 in the other wards. This is due to the fact that we have a labor room and a delivery room and two clinics operating in the same building.
With our increase in the numbers, we are simply busting out at the seams. We stuffed another bed into our already crowded three bed labor ward. The govt. has informed us that we need a minimum of six. I couldn’t agree more, but we have no space. We have two delivery tables side by side in our delivery room. One of them is our former Gyn exam table. It is now very common to have patients recovering from their surgeries lined up in beds down the hallway because there simply are no other beds or rooms available. We have a few private rooms but they remain full. Two weeks ago patient’s families were literally fighting in the hallway to be admitted into the only available private room.
On top of the maternity increase, our Gyn patient load is escalating. During our two Gyn clinic days, Monday and Thursday, it is not unusual for me to get home at 8 PM. We then have two full surgery days on Tuesdays and Friday with a make-up day on Wednesday. All this to say….It is the best of times (because we are growing) and the worst of times, (because we are overworked and out of space)! We are working on a creative plan to add more clinic space thus creating more bed space. St.ay tuned for the details! –An update from Dr. Mark and Allison Karnes, October 2015

Two recovering surgical patients in the overcrowded hallway in the OB ward
Patients in Hallway


Meet Sok

Meet Sok. She plays an irreplaceable role at Soddo Christian Hospital, which ultimately translates into excellent medical care for patients presenting to the hospital. Learning about how laboratories run, industrial oxygen concentrators, ordering of supplies for different departments - such as sourcing IV contrast for CT scans, suction catheters and oxygen face masks, etc. She has been the kick-start to many of the educational programs for the doctors including initiating radiology teaching rounds, medical grand rounds, teaching ECGs to the PAACS residents and GPs.  We are even able to access radiology in the comfort of our homes and wards and is particularly helpful when asking for consultations between specialties. An amazing achievement in rural Ethiopia.

**Today we thank Sok for her service!**

[ois skin="Blog Post Share"]


A day in the life of a Soddo Christian Hospital team member

 "A man has been stabbed in the neck. He is going to die."

These words, spoken calmly and as a matter of fact by the ICU head nurse, came as we were doing an early morning ward round prior to our planned weekend getaway to nearby Awassa. Glancing up at Dr. Ryan and Dr. Kyley, our visiting maxillofacial surgeons from the St.ates; our eyes met and without much ado, hurried to the emergency department. Reports of a large wound at the back of his neck with bone visible and a smaller wound in his anterior neck, among other injuries, made us realize that the best place to care for the patient was in the operating suite.

Meanwhile, the entourage surrounding the patient arrived in the OR with his relatives commandeering the stretcher, bringing him to the OR via the shortest route through the back door. Having gone in head first, the stretcher could not be turned around and had to be reversed into the corridor for a 180 degree spin and re-entry made, allowing a hurried transfer onto the operating table. Never mind the ABC’s of airway, breathing, etc in this race to get him to the destination.

"Oxygen, mask, laryngoscope" barks Kyley to the man standing next to him. A blank look in reply, the commands were to no avail as he was the patient's brother, not an OR worker. Amidst the chaotic, frantic activity, equipment arrived after what seemed an eternity. Blood miraculously materialized in record time, (thanks to the medical director's dash to the blood bank) and was quickly administered after a dunk in warm water. An emergency crico-thyroidotomy was necessitated to secure his airway as we were unable to effectively ventilate him with bag and mask. All along, the maxillofacial surgeons orchestrated the airway and resuscitation.

The neck injury was a through and through stab wound, entering from the posterior neck and exiting anteriorly, severing several healthy arteries supplying the posterior neck muscles. Brachial plexus, trachea, esophagus and the great vessels of the neck were spared anteriorly. Other major injuries included two deep lacerations into his left proximal thigh, a through and through laceration of one hand and another into the knuckles of his other hand.  

It all ended well, the patient woke up with smiles.

[ois skin="Blog Post Share"]


Keeping Babies Warm

In Soddo, we are up above 6,000 feet elevation.  So, for much of the year, it is fairly chilly.  One of the challenges for us is to keep newborns warm after delivery.  In the West, every delivery room has an infant warmer where the baby is placed shortly after birth.  But in Ethiopia, we had struggled to find a quality product at a good price that would do this job.

That was when our pediatrician, Dr. Dave Ayer, had the great idea to make our own.  He partnered with our hospital welder Yohannes, who welded a steel frame together.  Then they mounted a space heater on the top of it.  Voila!  Our own homemade infant warmer.

[ois skin="Blog Post Share"]


Teamwork at SCH

PicMonkey Collage

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

As our capabilities at Soddo Christian Hospital expand, we are working together as a team to make diagnoses, and provide cutting edge treatment for patients.  The other day, we had a woman present to the Emergency Room with upper abdominal pain and fever.  The ER docs did a great job with the bedside ultrasound finding what appeared to be either a fluid collection or a mass in her liver (top left picture).  Then, a CT scan by the Radiology Department confirmed that it was indeed an abscess in the liver (lower pane).  Finally, our expert radiologist teamed up with our surgeons (that's our chief resident Dr. Segni in the top right picture) to do an ultrasound-guided percutaneous drain.  This is a minimally invasive way to get the infection out instead of a big operation.

We are so proud of all of our services working together to get the best outcomes for patients!  Praise God for new technologies and teamwork!

[ois skin="Blog Post Share"]